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Why the Metaparadigm is Necessary to Nurse Theory Construction

The metaparadigm of nursing is comprised of four parts: person, health, environment, and
nursing. This concept is important to nursing theory, because those 4 parts are the key areas of focus when it comes to patient care.

Person

It may seem obvious that “person” refers to the patient himself or herself, but in this metaparadigm, the “person” can refer to more than one person, including the patient’s family members and friends. The nurse’s goal when dealing with the “person” is to nurture the patient and empower him or her to manage their own health to the best of his or her abilities. Nurses should make their patients feel like they truly care about their health and well-being.

Health

The next part of the metaparadigm of nurse theory construction is “health.” This refers to the patient’s wellness as well as his or her access to healthcare. Patients’ health refers to a large variety of aspects of the person’s wellbeing such as genetic factors, and also includes less obvious factors such as the patients’ intellectual, emotional, and spiritual wellness.

It is important to note that when assessing a patient’s health, “health” is not an absolute term, but a relative one. For instance, an 80 year old man who can do 5 pushups is likely considered to be in great health, where as an 18 year old man who can only do 5 pushups would typically be viewed as being less healthy compared to the average man his age.

Environment

The environment refers to everything around patients that impacts their illness and recovery. “Environment” in this instance is not limited to external factors and includes internal and social factors such as mental state, geographic location, culture, and personal relationships. It is very important for the patient to be in an environment that is conducive to his or her recovery.
Nursing

The final component in the metaparadigm of nursing is “nursing”. Nursing refers to all of the special skills that an individual must acquire to become a nurse including medical knowledge, technical skills, and any “hands-on” nursing care. While applying these skills, nurses must be sure to show compassion for their patients. A lack of empathy for patients will likely have a detrimental effect on the their health and recovery.

Conclusion

In order to be a complete nurse, an individual must attend to all aspects of the patients’ well-being. If done correctly, a nurse can be sure that he or she is providing the best care possible for the patient.